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Full text of "The Ross government and progressive Ontario [microform] : a brief story of Ontario's development under Liberal government : provincial elections, January 25th, 1905"

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MICIOCOPV RBOLUTKm TEST CHART 

{ANSI ond ISO TEST CHART No. 2) 




A /APPLIED IfVHGE In c 

^SC 1653 East Mom Streel 

B'.a Hocneslef. New fork M609 US* 

^K (716) *82 - OJOO - Phone 

^B (716) 288 - 59B9 - fa> 






^ 



The Ross Government 



AND 



Progrbsive Ontario 




BON. (UO. W. BOSS 
Fnnuer of Ovtario 



A Brief Story of Ontario's Dieveiopnient 

UND^ UBB^AL GOVERNMENT 



v^ 



:i) 



PROGRESSIVE ONTARIO 



:■ f] ^ cr e A 

'■ •''-■■ d C t/' 



fe. 



**, 



^i»-f 



THE ROSS GOVERNMENT 

THE SPLENDID FINANCIAL POSITION OF 
ONTARIO. 



OUR PROVINCE IN THE LEAD. 



Financial Standing of the Province of Ontario 

Receipts -i86, to 31st rocettibcr, 1903 $123,031,976.53 

Expenditures- -1 86- U> 31st December, 1903. . . . 'i',"37,i<)7.S3 

Cash oil band 31SI December, 1903 ■,994,679.00 

Asses of tlie Province, 31st December, 1903. . . 8,383,306. 11 

Liabilities of the Province, 3i5t December, 1903 5,834,141.99 

Surplus of Assets after deducting Liabilities . . 2,549 164 12 
Cash In lUe bniiksi on K«cciubrr l«th, IJHM 

(the dale .>r diDKoliilloii) $'i,'r:t9.!(00.00 

Out of x total expenditure of $113,191,1,72 since 1871, 
over $</5,ooo,ooo have been returned to the people. 

Money Returned to the People 

Out of a total expenditure of $113,191,872.69 since 1871 the 
following sums might be fairly taken as contributions either for 

the relief of taxation, or for the improvement of the country : 

Education $20,042,769 . 61 

Toronto University, fire grant 160,000,00 

Hospitals and charities 3.965,775 1 1 

Maintenance of Asylums and Public I'^stitutions . 20,583,648 01 

Surplu.i distribution, 1^,73 3ij88,777.47 

Distribution of clergy lands 931,994.50 

Refunds land improvement fund ,539,614.76 

Agriculture and arts 4.97i.'995.54 

Immigration 987,767.80 

.Administration of justice 10,966,391 .24 

A'' to railways, including annuity repayments... Ii,3ii,4i7.27 

C lization roads 3.694,247.79 

Municipal drainage ',221,117.35 

Swamp drainage 238,405^09 

River, lake, and bridge works '. 150.965 .47 



4 THK ROM4 l.OVERNMENT 

N«tlon»l parks tlnce iB8j 1 13,151. 41 

Public buildings — construction outlay 9.S'8.S7" .10 

Repairs ami maintenance since 1 884 i ,459,097 . gi 

Tslal of over •»S.O«0.<NM» 

Debts of Other Provinces 

Quebec ^ $jj,oi7,902 

Nova Scotia 3,028,807 

New Brunswick 3,213,946 

British Columbia 8,539,878 

During 1903, Ontario received the sura of $195,357 76 as 
interest on investments, while the Province of Quebec paid in 
interest and charges on lu'r public debt no less a sum than 
$I,577,58319- 

Ontario has received ii|; to December 15, 1904, the sum of 
$3io,jo8 as interest on trust funds held by the Dominion and on 
special deposits in the banks. 

Railways Aided 

Name op R.mlw.w 
Belleville & North Hastings 

Brantford, Norfolk & Port Burwcll 

Bruce Mines & Algoma 

Canada Central 

Canada Southern 

Central Counties 

Central Ontario 

Cobourg, Peterboro & Marmora 

Credit Valley 

Canada Atlantic 

Erie & Huron 

Grand Trunk, Georgian Bay & Lake Erie 

Grand Junction 

Grand Trunk Ry., as assignee of the 

Magnetawan River Railway 

Hamilton & North Western .*. . . 

Fi amilton & Lake Eric 

Irondale, Bancroft & f)ttawii 

James Bay Railway 

Kingston & Pembroke 

Lake Simcoe Junction 

London, Huron & Bruce 

Montreal & Ottawa 



MlURS 


TOTAI, 


22 


$114,206.40 


33 


129,353 60 


16 


91,565.60 


48 


'25.957 15 


63 


=44.559-20 


■ 7 


68,747.26 


21 


117,534-40 


9 


18,740.00 


153 


807,350.85 


66 


454,887.60 


41 


123,834.87 


79 


231,446.00 


66 


278,067.60 


2 


IO,UOO.OO 


144 


727,697. 20 


33 


66,960 00 


4.S 


2,50,569.60 


■4 


27,612.00 


89 


606,945 70 


26 


,'13,000.00 
268,839.60 


69 


50 


186,560.00 



^ ^ 



THK HOHM UOVRRNMKNT 



Midland 

Morth Siiracoc , . 

NorttiiTn lixunsiiiii 

Ontario & Riiiiiy RiviT (Can. Ndrth.) 

Unturio, Iklinont \' Nnrthcni 

(Ottawa, Arnprii>r & I'arry S<nnul 

IVmbruke SoiiiluTn 

Prince Artliur's Landing 

Prince Edward County 

Port Dover iv. l.alie Huron 

Pt. Arthur, Dnlutli &.\Vcst. (Can. North.) 

Parry Sound Colonization 

Stratford & Lake Huron 

Toronto, Grey & Bruce 

Toronto & Ntpissing 

Tillsonhurg, Lake lirie & Pacific 

\'ictoria 

Wellington, Grey & Bruce 

Whitby, Port Perry & Lindsay 

Ottawa & New York (Internationa 

Bridge 

Dominion Bridge Co. (Interprovinc 

Bridge) 



yi 


^■3,5" <;o 


VI 


144,24 r ft,, 


7" 


11)6, 1 S,s o) 


i6K 


2,001,416 <K) 


o 


M.TS Ko 


"4'J 


»l-!,b<)2 uii 


|8 


10.1,540 80 


b 


jo,747.20 


.^5 


i55,,S2o.oo 


'>1 


116,000.00 


«o 


463.,?"5.54 


48 


267,247.20 


J7 


5j,ooo.oo 


151 


46 1, •164. 40 


4b 


105,212.00 


ly 


71.29j.20 


.0 


.'537..V7.20 


121 


.^41,276.00 


4h 


I29,7g<).40 




65,297.60 




93,284.00 


304 


$11,111,417.27 



NEW ONTARIO AND CROWN LANDS 



Increase of population since 1871 in New Ontario 129,849 

Miles of Colonization Roads built since 1871 . . 5,672 

Area of Province still undisposed of acres 102,263,707 

Area of Old Ontario settled and assessed 

(acres) 24,000,000 

Area of Clay Belt, New Ontario acres 16,000,000 

Estimate of Puipwood in New Ontario, .cords 283,000,000 

Value of royalty on puipwood at 40 cents a 

cord..- $115,200,000 

Estimated value of Pine uncut 1175,000,000 

Estimated value of Hardwood $50,000,000 

Revenue from Crown Lands since Confederation $39,040,946 

Revenue from Crown Lands for 1903 $2,459,110 

Revenue from Crown Lands for 10 months of 

1904 $2,314,864 

TIMBER SALES 

Under the Sandfield Macdonald Qovernment (4 

sales) average bonus per mile $ 260 

Under the Blake Qovernment (I sale) average 

bonus per square mile $ 117 

Under the Mowat Qovernment (6 sales) average 

bonus per square mile $1,204 

Under the Hardy Qovernment (I sale) average 

bonus per square mile $1,665 

Under the Ross Government (3 sales) average 

bonus per square mile $3,245 



8 



NIW ONTARIO AND CROWNjjLANDS 



PROVINCIAL PULP WORKS 

8AULT STE. MARIE 

Output per day tons 100 

No. of men employed 130 

Monthly waces paid $6,500 

Amount invested in Pulp Works $l,02i',S44 

STURQEON FALLS 

Output of paper per day tons 40 

No. of men employed, including men in the 

woods 300 

Monthly wanes paid 8:i3,.-i00 

Amount invested in Pulp Worlcs $1,600,000 

SPANISH RIVER 

Amount invested $700,000 

The Works at Spanish River have a capacity of i lo tons per 
day, and it is expected will be running early next season. The 
mill will probably employ 350 [men, including those at work in 
the woods, and will consume 30,000 cords of pulpwood per year. 



RAILWAYS IN NEW ONTARIO 

THE CANADIAN NORTHERN, aided by the Government, 
extends from Port Arthur to Lake Superior, through the Rainy 
River Valley to Winnipeg, and connects with the Railway Sys- 
tems belonging to the Company in Manitoba and the North-West 
Territories. It is expected that within a year the Western exten- 
sion of this road will reach as far as Edmonton. Without aid 
from the Ontario Government, it would have been impossible 
to build it. Besides giving an additional railway to Winnipeg, 
it opens up the Rainy River Valley, said to contain nearly a 
million acres of arable land. 

THE ALGOMA CENTRAL RAILWAY.— This railway is 
intended to connect Sault Ste. Marie with the Canadian Pacific 
Railway. Eighty-seven m-Jes have been completed, and 107 
additional are^ready for the rails, leaving 2,5 miles to be con- 
structed in order to make connection with the C.P.R. For the 



'^i^. 



NEW ONTARIO AND CROWN LANDS 



9 



construction of this road the Government has appropriated 
7,400 acres per mile. '^^ '^ 

withS^ ^^'^•^'^^/^Y-™' "^"^ «^""'^'» Toronto 
with Sudbury— a distance of about 265 miles. It opens a new line 
through the Counties of York, Ontario, Simcoe. and through the 
Distncts of Muskoka and Parry Sound, rendering accessible to 
settlement large tracts of country rich in timber and agricultural 
lands. By an Act of last Session the Government endorses the 
bonds of this railway to the extent of S20.000 a mile. 

GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC.-The Government has agreed 
to a grant of 6,000 acres and $2,000 per mile as a bonus for a 
railway to connect Port Arthur with the Grand Trunk Pacific— 
a distance of 200 miles. This road will connect, by means of 
the watep of Lakes Huron and Superior, all the Western parts 
of Ontano with the markets of the North- West, and will be of 
advantage to every town on the west coast of the Province from 
Windsor all the way North, in furnishing them with additional 
transportation facilities. 

oATT^ur^J^^ifi?^^^™^ ^"^O NORTHERN ONTARIO 
RAILWAY.— This isf the only railway in Ontario which is being 
constructed as a Government work and to be owned by the Gov- 
ernment. Passenger trains are now running from \orth Bav to 
New Liskeard— a distance of 112 miles, and construction trains 
north of New Liskeard— a distance of 25 miles. A contract has 
been given for the extension of the road to the junction of the 
trrand Trunk Pacific, in the neighborhood of Lake Abittibi— 
a probable distance of 200 miles in all. This road will afford 
access to the great fertile belt of Northern Ontario, and will 
greatly facihtate in settling that part of the Province 

NEPIGON RAILWAY. -This road is intended to connect 
Lake bupenor with Lake Nepigon— a distance of 40 miles The 
Grand Trunk Pacific will pass within probably 40 miles of the 
north end of Nepigon, affording access from Lake Superior, includ- 
ing railways to be built and the navigation of the Lake— a 
distance of 170 miles. In the interior of the country there are 
valuable mineral as well as agricultural lands. It will also con- 
nect with the Grand Trunk Pacific. 



GENERAL RAILVTAT POLICY OF THE 
GOVERNMENT 

The object of the Government in aiding railroads has been 
to develop and render accessible the unsettled lands of the Prov- 
ince, the estimated area 'of whichlis]over 100,000,000 acres 



10 



NEW ONTARIO AND CROWN LANDS 



The importance of such a policy wiU be appafft "^flil '"^* rf 
tsat in 1 88 1 there were only 12 miles of railway m this part ot 
the Pmvinc^ mrVhe rilroads now under contract are enm- 
pletKTontr^rwill have 1,000 miles of railway not including 
the Cknd Trunk Pacific, which extends from East to West, 
North rf the height of land-a distance of over 750 miles. 

How to aetUe and make productive this vast area is a 
problem well worthy of the attention of the Province. 

TIMBER POLICY 

For the last fifty years the Government has been disposing 
of itf Umber by aurtiin, and although a very large revenue- 
nearly fort^mftlions of dollars-has been received from this 
^Z the Government is now considering a change of pohcy 
^^ch it is expected the forests can be P«J^rved/oj all time 
and made to yield a handsome revenue. Instead ofjf ''"S «\^ 
timber outright, to be cut down as the purchaser may feel inchned 
iJTnow intei^ded to merely sell the matured timber, leaving 
the sSer tr«s as far as they can be protected, for sales m later 
v^i wto AeV have reached their full growth and are in a 
bSt« Audition for the market. A pine forest, at a low estimate, 
inc'S^ at the rate of eight per cent, in growth every year 
To twfshould be added the constantly increasing value of pne 
timber hence an enormous addition to the forest wealth of the 
pSvin;^ If this policy can be successfully worked out, forests 
can™ preserved Whout any abatement of the income now 
derived from them. ... x , 

FOREST RESERVES.— A step in this direction was taken 
when the Forest Reserves Act. passed in 1898, provided for the 
Stration ft^ the agricultural area of the Province lands 
• ^fitted for famung to be used perpetually for growmg timber 
"y ab^ut seven millions of acres have been set apart for 
this pmpose and no lumbering allowed withm the areas> [set 
apart. 
The list o Re ervjs are as follows:— 

In Frontenac & Addington 80,000 acres. 

North Shore Lake Superior 45,<»o 

Temagami 3.776.o«> 

Misfflssaga River ''^^''"'™ 

Algonquin Park 1,101,000 

Rondeau Park S'°°° 

Total 6,9!i7,ooo 



NEW ONTARIO AND CROWN LANDS H 

J^X"^f """""'"f '""^ °' '-^ 1«P-«' Of up to 

Total area sold or loased 

Total area located 22,IJD1,6C8 

1,644,635 

Total area disposed c,f . 

», , , , „ 23,7.'i6,203 

lotal area of Provinco. 

Total area disposed of 126,000,000 

23,736,203 

Total area ujidisposod of 

Acres 102,263,797 

THE SAULT INDUSTRIES 

In 1895 the first concession was made to Mr tt h m 
for the establishment of Pulp Works at jW^JmU n ; ^^''f"* 

VeneSrMi.rs"te»nt':'S It^rdA.'r '"'''■ 

crippled the industries that thev had to ^^n/V" "^°'-' ^ 
and as a consequence about .ooo^Xn'^U-thrwrotre-SX' 

advance°h™TduTrhe eZI """"" '° '''' Government to 

Banks was, therefore a he^ n„ ,1 ^ ^'^"^"''f """^^ t° the 
der will be paid on o^ &"'tte1s?:f'S"ay nexf^ ""^'"- 



„, omm .«» ™"» '■'"" 



a ready earned amountmg to at least mo, ^^ ^.^^^ of railroad 



NEW ONTARIO AND CROWN LANDS 



IS 



(2) The Pulp Mills produce 100 tons of pulp per day. which 
»t I15 a ton, earn $1,500 per day. 

(3) The Helen Mine is producing 1,000 tons of iron ore per 
day at S3. 25 per ton, earning $3,250 per day. 

The earning power of the other industries cannot be so 
accurately estimated, but may be put at $200 per day. 

On the ist of November there were employed in these var- 
ious industries 3.958 men. The pay roll for the month of 
October was $130,049.49. 

Mr. Whitney, in an address at Mr. Borden's meeting in the 
Massey Hall, October 4th, 1904. said that the $2,ooo,o<X) given 
in aid of the Sault industries might as well have been thrown 
into Lake Superior. This is Mr. Whitney's idea of the dutv of 
a Government in a great crisis. 

TOWN SITES IN NEW ONTARIO.-As the Temiskaming 
and Northern Ontano Railroad will pass through lands chiefly in 
the Crown from North Bay through New Liskeard to the junction 
of the Grand Trunk Pacific, it is intended bv the Government to 
select the sites on which it is most likely that towns or villages 
might be most successful] established. These lands will be sur- 
veyed by the Government on the most approved plan and cer- 
tain lands reserved for schools, churches, public halls and hos- 
pitals. A similar plan will be adopted with regard <o town 
sites on the Grand Trunk Pacific between the borders of Quebec 
and Mamtoba-a distance of not less than 750 miles— making 
in aU between the two railways 950 miles. At least fifty town 
sites m this distance will be laid out, and although it could not 
be expected that every site would become a large town yet it 
may be safely assumed that, having regard to the agricultural 
wealth and other resources of the country, many of the sites 
-Till become prosperous towns. The proceeds of these sales 
wiU be taken into the public treasury and will form part of the 
fund out of which the loan for the construction of the railway 
will be repaid. Heretofore town sites along railroads aided 
by the Government passed into private hands, and in many 
cases have been used for speculative purposes. The Govern- 
ment proposes that the people of Ontario shall share in the benefit 
of the settlement of this Province— a settlement to which the 
public treasury has so largely contributed. The Canadian Pacific 
Railway has already received $[1,000,000 from the sale of town 
sites on the lands granted by the Dominion Govemnment or 
secured by the Company while the road was under construction. 
GOOD ROADS.— In igoi the Government set apart the 
sum of $1,000,000 for the improvement of public highways. 



j4 NEW ONTARIO ANU CHOWN LANDS 

Although only tHr«jea. ^ - eUp^ »^^^^^ 

that have by-laws f°; '^^PJP^rieton. While by-laws have 
Victoria, Uncoia Brant, *"^ J-*""°" j, being considered 
"V^n%'^x^VeTl^nd ind^'n^^'r'of otlfer Counties 
l?er the AcTan ^penditure of $543.ooo has been made, of 
wWch $.8.,o^ has be^n contributed by the Provmce. 

BLEOTRICAL POWER AT NIAGARA FALLS 

Concessions have been granted to three diffe«n\compan^s 

iBvenue-produdng investment. 



fli 



AGRICULTURE AND DAIRYING 



Op«nta for AcPloultura, 1879 9 70,8B8 

OpuiU for Affploultupo, 1004, Inoludlnff 

Oapaptment $SS7,75S 

No. of aopes of fapm land* aaaaaaad 28,080,028 

No. ot aopea of oleaped land 18,648,660 

No. of aopea of awamp, mapah and waate 

'•""•" S,6eS,061 

No. of aopaa of woodland 6,710,012 

CAPITAL INVESTED IN FARM LANDS. 
BUILDINGS, ETC. 

Value of fapm landa 9680,860,470 

Value of buUdlnva 247,620,108 

Value of Implemehta 68,806,100 

Value of stock 104,827,267 

■To**! «l,O8e,822,O80 

Inopeaae slno^ 1807 918I,72«,472 

CHEESE FACTORIES 

180O lOOS 

No. of oheeae flaotoplea 817 i,i86 

No. of lbs. of oheeae produced 70,864,718 160,806,678 

Value of oheeae ppoduoed 97,180,007 917,208,28b 

CREAMERIES 

I80O ieo8 

' No. of opeameples SO 266 

No. of Iba. of buttep 1,808,080 10,812,186 

Value of buttep ppoduoed $860,104 92,006,608 



16 



AORICULTURK AND DAMYINa 



OPPOaiTIOH TO THE DSPARTMBNT OP 
AQRICULTURB 

In the Scasion of 1893, Mr. Whitney oppoeed the appoint- 
ment of an Assistant in the Department of Natural History. 

In 1897 he opposed a giant of $1,400 to the Poultry Asso- 
ciation of Ontario. 

In 1899 he opposed the vote of $2,500 for instruction in 
fruit spraying; a vote for $1,000 for the Pioneer Farm; and 
$2,600 to the Western Dairy School. 

Mr. Whitney voted against the apporntmen'.. of a Good Roads 
Instructor, although it is universally admitted now that such an 
appointment was of great advantage to the Province. 

Mr. Whitney opposed the appointment of a Drainage Referee 
although the municipalities have already borrowed nearly two 
millions of dollars for dainage purposes. 

PARMER8' INSTITUTES 

No. of meetings held, 1903-3, ending 30th June, 1903, 837 
No. of persons in attendance, 1903, ending 30th June, 1903, 126,3.52 

WOMEN'S INSTITUTES 

No. of meeting" held, 1903-4, ending 30th June, 1904, 960 
No. of persons, n attendance, ending 30th June, 1904, 44,698 

GENERAL WORK OF THE AGRICULTURAL 
DEPARTMENT 

The Agricultural Department has the supervision of the fol- 
lowing institutions for farmers: — 

DAIRY SCHOOLS.— 3 Dairy Schools— Guelph, Kingston 
and Strathroy, attended by 2,240 persons. 

PIONEER FARM IN ALGOMA.— One hundred and fifty 
miles west of Port Arthur, for the purpose of testing the soil and 
dinu^te of that portion of New Ontario. 

EXPERIMENTAL FRUIT STATIONS— located at 15 dif- 
ferent points in the Province. 

479 Agricultural and Horticultural Societies. 

14 different Associations, such as Fruit Growers, Dairymen, 
and Breeders' Associations of different kinds. 

THE ONTARIO AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, with an 
attendance in 1903 of 738 students. 

THE SIR WILLIAM MACDONALD INSTITUTE for in- 
struction in Domestic Science, opened this year, and attended by 
107 farmers' daughters. 



AliRICULTURE AM) DAIHYINO 



17 



ADVANTAOB OF THB DBPARTMBMT 

The advtnUfC of the Department ii shown (i) by the im- 
provement of agriculture and the Ir ~ increase in the exports 
of cattle which has taken place in tht year 1903, and (j) by the 
success of Caiiadian exhibitors when they come into competition 
with American exhibitors, as in the case of the World's Fair, in 
1893, the PnnAmerican Exposition in 1901, and the St. Louis 
Exposition IS shown by the following prizes and awards at St. 
Louis:— 

HOHUS 

Only one exhibitor. His wins include five first prizes 
and six championships. 

CATTI.B 

Only one exhibitor, who exhibited Ayrshires. His wins 
include four first prizes on individual animals and first prize for 
the herd. 

•HIBP 

Shropshire'!- i exhibitor — 10 championships and 19 firsts. 

Oxfords — I exhibitor — 4 firsts and a reserve for champion. 

Southdowns — i exhibitor — 4 firsts and 3 championships. 

Cotswolds — 3 exhibitors — 13 first prizes, 1 1 seconds, 3 champion- 
ships and 3 reserves for champions. 

Lincolns — i exhibitor — 24 iirsts, 19 seconds and 12 (all) cham- 
pionships in his class. 

Leicesters — 3 exhibitors, 27 firsts, 26 seconds and 12 champion- 
ships. 

Dorset Horns— 2 exhibitors — 17 firsts, 7 seconds, 12 thirds and 
10 championships. 

Suffolks — Two out of the three prizes offered. 

SWINB 

Yorkshires— 13 firsts, 14 seconds, 10 thirds and 8 championships. 

Tamworths — i exhibitor — 16 firsts, 12 seconds and 5 champion- 
ships. 

Essex — I exhibitor — 5 firsts, 10 seconds, 6 thirds, and i cham- 
pionship. 

POULTRY 

In most classes in which exhibitors from the Province of 
Ontario entered they swept the board. * 

These exhibits were made on the personal responsibility of 
the exhibitors, but all prizes won are duplicated by the Dominion 
Government. 



PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS 



Th« numbap of paPMna o«p«d fbr In th* dUhpant 
Inatltutlons 'n th* yaar looa wu aa fbllowa: 

OantPBl Pplaon ,Q,g 

Rafopmatopy Hop Boya I5g 

Mapoap Raftopmatopy fop Woman aaa 

Savan LunaUo Aayluma g^gaa 

Aaylum fop IdloU at Oplllla j^g 

4B County and OlatPlot Oaola 8,sai 

SO Dlatplot Lookupa gg, 

Ontario Inatltutlon fbp tha Blind m 

Ontaplo Inatltutlon fop tha Daaf and Dumb 288 

tSOHoapttal. 3gg„ 

41 Houaaa of Ratuca B,ipa 

88 Opphanavaa ^yg 

4 InduatPlal Sohoola (2 fop Boya and 2 fbp 

°""-> 857 

''"^ ^^Z 

Avapaca ooat pap patlant, Amaploan Aayluma 

1898 to 1900 8188 28 

Avaparn ooat pep patient, Canadian Aayluma 

1898tolB00 10g,g 

Avapaca ooat pep patient, Ontaplo Aayluma 

»«» 12620 



-"' rUBMC INSTITlITIOXa 

statement of amounts expended as per the follow- 
IHK headingB, being for 36 years from 1868 to l»OS, 
both years Included : 

Lands, Bu!Iding:s and Equipment of 

Public Institutions $ 6,787,167.08 

Maintenance of Public Institutions 20,829,986.18 
Grants to Hospitals and Charities 4,018,796.11 

Grand Total 931,605,917.87 

NEW ASYLUMS 
Within the last two years, two additional Asylums were 
opened— one at Cobourg and the other at Penetanguishene The 
Cobo"r„ Asylum has ahont i6o female inmates, who do not 
rcqui .pceial attendants on aceount of their age and harmless 
dispositions. The Asylum at Pcnelanguishene oceupies the 
bmlding formerly used as the Reformatory tor Boys. The attend- 
ance at the Reformatory was p;radnall>- falling oil— the few boys 
remaining were transferred tcj the Mimico Industrial Seluxil and 
the building.s wineh the>- had oceiipied were adapted for Asylum 
purposes. By the opening of these two institutions, the other 
Asyluiiis were greatly relieved, a.id it is now considered the accom- 
modation of this branch of the Public .Service is adequate for 
several years to come. 



THE LICENSE ACT 



Total number of Tavern Licenses 

Total number of Shop License!. 

Total number of Wholesale Licenses 
Total number of Vessel Licenses 

Total 6,185 2,899 

If licenses had been issued in 190,3-4 at the ratio that obtained 
in 1874-5 they would have reached 8,928, instead of 2,899 the 
actual number. ^^ 

No. of organized llunicipalities in Province. . . ,go 

No. in wliich no Tavern License is issued ,70 

No. in which one and not more than two are issued. 286 

No. of Municipalities without a shop License gg, 



License 


License 


Year. 


Year. 


'874-5 


'903-4 


4,793 


2.577 


1.307 


- 300 


52 


- 22 


33 


none 



PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS 



21 



NUMBER OF LICENSES EL.SE'WHERE 

Province of Quebec, one to each 635 persons. 
Province of Ontario, one to each 753 persons. 
City of Montreal, one to each 345 persons. 
City of Toronto, one to each i ,000 persons. 

COMMITMENTS FOR DRUNKENNESS 

The commitments to gaol, according to population, were: — 
In 1876, one for every 444 persons. 
In 1903, one for every 730 persons. 
Local Option is now in force in 37 municipalities. 
Temperance was taught in the Pnhlic and Separate Schools 
ot the Province in 1903 to lyS'SoG persons. 



EDUCATIONAL PROGRESS 



tm ItM MCKMIt 

Number of Public Schools 6,203 6,146 948 

Number of Teachers 6,687 9,466 2,869 

Number of First-Clas'Oertiflcates 246 610 364 

Number Second-CIas ;.<irtificates 2,169 4,461 2,282 

Numbbi trained in Normal School 1,873 4,967 8,094 

Number of Pupils passed En- 
trance Exams; 4,371 13,003 8,632 

Number of High Schools 104 186 31 

Number of New High School 

Buildings since 1882 68 88 

Number of High School Teachers 332 619 287 

Number of Pupils in High Schools 12,348 86,722 13,374 

Number of Pupils who left; for 

Agricultural Pursuits 646 844 198 

Number who left for Mercar 'e 

Life 881 1,806 92« 

Number of PubUc Libraries 94 481 387 

Number of volumes taken out by 

Readers 261,920 2 630,769 2,278,849 

Number of Students, School of 

Science 18 406 386 

Number of University Students 342 907 566 



24 



EDUCATIONAL PROORI^ 



hi 



I 



SPECIAL FEATURES OF THE SCHOOL STSTBM 

PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 
The new curriculum of studies adopted in 1904 provides 
for instruction in DOMESTIC SCIENCE AND COOKERY, 
MANUAL TRAINING AND NATURE STUDY. 

FREE TEXT-BOOKS FOR RURAL SCHOOLS. 
The Regulations of the Education Department provide 
that any public or separate school in rural districts may, by 
resolution of its board, decide to have certain text-books pur- 
chased for the pupils free of cost to the parents or guardians. 
Any rural school board which provides such text-books free for 
the scholars shall be entitled to a grant equivalent to one-half 
the amount expended, from whatever money may be appro- 
priated for the purpose by the Legislature. The Government is 
prepared to pay one-half the cost of text-books when supplied 
by trustees of rural schools. 

COST OF TEXT-BOOKS IN THE UNITED STATES. 
In the United States the publication of text books is not, 
with few exceptions, controlled by the Departments of Educa- 
tion. Publishers, therefore, usually fix their own prices, and 
the school authorities have power to change text-books from 
time to time, as t'ley may deem expedient. In some States 
the free text-booV. system has been adopted; i.e., the trustees 
purchase the text-books for the use of pupils, charging the cost 
to the ratepayers in the same way as the salaries of teachers 
and other school expenses are charged. The following state- 
ment, based upon the latest data known to the Education Depart- 
ment, sho'vs the cost per pupil in a few states and cities that 
have adopted free text-books: — 

Massachusetts, average cost per pupil $1 62 

New York 60 to . 70 

New Jersey 9 J 

Pennsylvania (with supplies) 98 

M'chigan (rural) 47 

Michigan (urban) 59 

Washington, D.C 46 

Detroit, Mich 6j 

Philadelphia, Pa i .oa 

Syracuse, N.Y i .00 

Stratford. Ont. (paid from fees) 23 

Brantford, " ' " 36 

Hamilton, " " 26J 



XDUCATIONAL PROORESS 



8S 



COST OF TEXT-BOOKS IN TORONTO, 8c. PER PUPIt. 

In the City of Toronto text-books are purchased for the 
pupils by the School Board under what is known as the Free 
Text-Book System. From the Inspector's Report (see p. i6 
of the Report of 1902) the following statement is taken ; — 

"The cost per pupil for text-books on the basis of average 
"monthly attendance, omitting kindergarten pupils, 
"was 9 4-5 cents. The cost per pupil for text-books 
"on the basis of total enrollment, omitting kinder- 
"garten pupils, was 8 cents." 

RURAL SCHOOL LIBRARIES PROVIDED FOR. 

The Regulations of the Education Department provide 
that any rural school board which provides a library of approved 
books for the scholars shall be entitled to a share of whatever 
money may be appropriated for the purpose by the Legislature. 
The powers, however, heretofore held by trustees to establish 
school libraries are not affected by the above provision, as boards 
have full authority under the provision of the Statute to pur- 
chase books for the school library and to make such selections 
as they may deem necessary. Any grant given by the Education 
Department, however, is based solely upon the amount expended 
for books as per catalogue or lists approved by the Education 
Department. 

TBCHNICAL EDUCATION 

For a great many years technical education received much 
attention in the German schools, and subsequently in the schools 
of France. The progress of Germany in the arts and manufac- 
tures induced the peopls of England to realize that the industries 
of the country would be seriously handicapped if the causes of 
the German Empire's supremacy in many lines were overlooked. 
Accordingly, technical education, including manual training and 
household science, were added to the crriculum of the city schools 
in the mother land, and with most gratilying results. The Ameri- 
cans, alive to the importance of technical skill in the growth of 
its industries, have expended large sums in recent years in 
equipping schools of technology, including requirements for art 
and industrial subjects. 

On several occasions many of our educationists in Ontario 
have urged the value of technical education in view of the neces- 
sity of preparing young persons to take a Uiore inteUigent part 
in the development of '^anada's vast resources The School of 
Practical Science in " o and the School of Mines in Kingston, 

ha\ e afforded oppoi .s for training in certain departments 



M 



EDIICATIONAL PF lESS 



where skill is essential. Aid to the extent of about THlRTy 
THOUSAMD DOLLARS is annually given to assist school 
boards inj,furm3hing equipment, and maintaining dtpartmenls 
of a technical character in municipalities which take advantage 
of the provisions that have been made. 

NORMAL SCHOOL WORK. 
At the Normal Schools in Toronto, London and Ottawa, 
and the Normal College in Hamilton, equipment is provided for 
manual training and household science, and instructors in these 
departments have a place on t'.ie regular staff, the object being 
to give every public and high school teacher some knowledge 
of the more elementary departments of technical education. To 
train specialists in manual training, the Macilonald Institute, 
Guelph, has been generously endowed by Sir William Macdonald. 
Departments of Household Science for training specialists are 
also provided in that institution, as well as in the Lillian Massey 
School, Torjnto, and in several other places. At present tech- 
nical education is taken up in Toronto, Hamilton, London, Guelph, 
Cobourg, Stratford, Beriin, Kingston, and Woodstock. Many 
other cities and towns are already taking steps to add depart- 
ments of tecl lical education to the courses of study taken up. 

SCHOOL OF PRACTICAL SCIENCE. 
In 1882, this school was attended by 18 students, with 3 
instructors. In 1903, there were 403 students, with a staff of 
2 1 instructors. The school has been greatly enlarged and equipped 
at an expense of about $250,000, and now may fairly rank with 
the best science schools on the continent. . The course of study 
consists of instruction in Mining Engineering, Mining, Civil and 
Electrical, and Hydraulic Engineering, Chemistry, Physics and 
Architecture. Graduates of the School of Science hold positions 
as Engineers in many of the largest works in Canada and the 
United States. 

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO. 

Under t' e policy of the Government adopted in 1885, all 
the universities in the City of Toronto, except McMaster, have 
become federated with the University of Toronto. 

In the Arts Faculty there are 74 professors and instructors. 
The number of students enrolled is 1,021. In the Medical Faculty 
the number of professors and instructors is 71, and the number 
of students enrolled 639. 



THE STURGEON FALLS CASE 

The Town of Sturgeon Falls granted l bonus of $7,000 to- 
wards the establishment of a pulp and paper mill within the 
corporation. The taxes of corporations usually go to the Public 
School unless where provision is made by the Roman Catholic 
membcrsof^the Corporation under the School Act, that a portion 
of them should go to the Separate School. In this case the 
stockholders in the Pulp and Paper Company were mostly resi- 
dents of Great Britain, and the Roman Catholics felt that in taxing 
themselves to pay for this bonus they would get no advantage to 
the Separate School unless they could make an arrangement with 
the Public School supporters for a division of the taxes. This 
they did by memorandum of agreement made on the 22nd day of 
June, 1898, the agreement being to the effect that half the taxes 
collected from the Sturgeon Falls Pulp Co. should go to the Sep- 
arate Schools and the other half to the Public Scmwls, the assess- 
ment of the property for this purpose being fixed at 840,000. 
The Public School Board failed to carry out this agreement, and 
collected the full taxes for the benefit of the Public Schools. As 
no relief could be granted by direct appeal, a Petition was sent 
to Parliament last session asking for a confirmation of the agree- 
ment made between the Public and Separate School Boards. 
This Petition came before the House on the loth of March and 
was referred to the Private Bills Committee, where a bill based 
upon the agreement was reported without any objection, the fol- 
lowing members of the Committee being present :— Hon. Mr. Har- 
conrt, Messrs. Auld, Brown, Buit, Carscallen (Lennox), Crawford, 
Dickenson, Duff, Fox, Gallagher, Graham, Gross, Guibord, Hendry, 
Hyslop, Holmes, Hoyle, James Jamicson. Joynl, Lee. Lucas, 
Matheson, Pense, Reaume, Reid, Richardson, Smith (Peel) and 
Truax. 

The third reading of the bill was taken on the 24th March. 
The bill was strongly attacked in the press as being a concession 
to the supporters of Separate Schools. On April 8th, Dr. Beattie 
Nesbitt, the Member for North Toronto, seconded by Dr. Pyne, 
moved that the Public School supporters be permitted to appear 
with counsel before the bar of the House, for the purpose of 
stating their case. The majority of the House held that this was 
an unusual procedure, as there had been ample opportunity for 
hearing the opponents of the bill on March i ith, when the first 
reading of the bill was taken, or in the Private Bills Committee 



2R 



TFIK STI'U'IEIIS KALI.S CASE 



on March .8th, or on March 2.st, cit the second reading or on 
March .,rd when it went through Conmnltee of the Whole or 
ev!n on the third readinK. There hn4 realK been "ve stap« 
when the bill IkuI been publielv befnr.. ,1,. I ouse, who" '* ecton 
might have been taken to it. Tlie motion, however, wa>. prtssed 
to a div sion. an.l was siipporled by the foUownig Members, 
Lrteen ,. al ---liarr, lieattv, Carnegie, Clark atrnee , Crawford, 
DuffKidi, Little (Cardweli), I.ueas, Mahaffy, Nesb.tt, 'resto., 
(iChim.), Pyne. Reid. Against the bill there were s= Metnbers 

° ^Thisp'ropertv is now assessed for over S^oo.ooo all the taxis 
on which 'go to the pn.lic, except the half collected on the sum 
of 840,000 contained in the agreement. 



THE STORY OF THE "MINNIE M" 



At tlie trial o( tlic iltclion petitiuii against J. N. Smith, the 
sitting member for Sault Ste. Marie, evidence was given to show 
that a steamer called the "Minnie M." was used to carry a num- 
ber of persons to the polls at Michipicoten and Helen Mine. 
Owing to suspension of the Scxj industries, the greater number 
of the men at these two places had left to seek employment 
elsewhere, and the object of tlie expedition of the "Minnie M." 
was evidently to bring to the polls a nninher of personators for 
the absentee /otes. On the e\eiiin>,' of the Saturday before the 
election, the Hon. Mr. Cibson and the Hon. Mr. Harcourt ad- 
dressed a meeting at Sault Ste. Marie, in the interests of the Liberal 
candidate. While the meeting was in progress, a letter was 
placed in Mr. Gibson's hands informing him that the "Minnie M." 
was about to sail for the places mentioned with a number of men 
whose avowed object was to personate absent voters on behalf 
of the Liberal candidate. The letter was received by derisive 
laughter by the meeting, and the Liberals on the platform de- 
nounced it as a Tory rcxirback, trumped up to affect the election. 
The project seemed so absurd and was stj vehemently denied, 
that Mr. Gibson attached no imp /rtance to the letter, declaring 
that he was not a policeman ; but this was not all he said, but 
went on for some time to point out the provisions of the law in 
such cases, the heavy penalties for such acts, and warned his 
hearers of any such attempts as those alleged. At the close of 
the meeting he spoke in a similar way to Mr. Smith and his friends, 
anti was given to understand and really believed that the story 
was baseless. Even if he had believed the story he could 
not have prevented a steamer leavir-^ an .American port — for 
the "Minnie M." had left from tlie American side of the river — to 
go wherever she pleased. K\en if infc«-mation had been laid 
before the police magistrate in regular way, he would be power- 
less, and the .\t .irney-General has less authority in connection 
with criminal offences than an ordinary justice of the peace. 
The "Minnie M." was under orders from Mr. Coyne, an American 
citizen, who was at the time in charge of tliat branch of the Soo 
industries, and all the arrangements for the alleged personation 
f>n the American side were made, as far as the evidence shows, 
bv one Patrick Galviii. then resident at the Soo. The Attorney- 
General was accordin.ly as powerless to^stop the "Minnie M." 
as he would have been to stop the sailing of the Baltic Fleet. 



80 



THK BTORT OF THK " UtNNIC M 



THE STEAMER " RUTH " 

It seems that a steamer called the "Ruth" had sailed un 
Saturday afternoon with Conservative personators to the same 
points as the "Minnie M." had gone, and that through the action 
of the Liberals she was forced to return. It is claimed that if the 
Liberals could have stopped the "Ruth" from sailing they could 
also have stopped the "Minnie M," The two cases are entirely 
different. The "Ruth" had no right to carry passengers, and 
htr owners were told if she proceeded on her voyage with the 
passengers whom they knew to be on board, proceedings would 
be taken to impose the fine which the law ;irescribes in the case 
of steamers or tugs carrying passengers without license. The 
owners of the "Ruth" tixjk alarm and succeeded in recalling her 
after she had pr(x:eedc(l sonic distance on her voyage. They 
htnllno power, however, of recalling the "Minnie M." 

THE PROSECUTIONS 

The next charge is that the Attorney-General failed in his 
duty by neglecting to take proceedings against the men reported 
for corrupt charges at the trial. The facts in regard to this mat- 
ter are briefly, that Mr. Du \'emet, who acted on the trial against 
Mr. Smith, applied to the Court at Ottawa for a summons to 
bring the persons found guilty of corrupt practices before Judf.e 
Osier, who was holding the Assizes at the Soo, before the Trial 
Judges had sent their report to the Speaker of the House; so 
anxious was he that the law should be put in motion, and within 
almost a few hours, if not minutes, of the signing of the report 
by the Judges, he applied for the necessary summonses, which 
he received and caused to he ser\ed on tiie offenders. As soon 
as the report had reached the Clerk of the House, the Attorney- 
General's Department got the names of the persons mentioned 
by the Jtidgcs as guilty of corrupt practices, and reported them 
to the Attorney at the Soo for action under the Statutes. The 
Attorney-General did not lose a moment of time in taking action, 
but between the time the report left the hand of the Judges until 
the time it reached the Clerk of the House, Mr. Du Vernet had 
obtained the necessary summonses on behalf of a private prose- 
cutor, having needlessly taken the matter out of the Attorney- 
General's hands. Mr. Pu Vernet then applied for funds with 
which to carry on the prosecution, his application being tnade 
before the report of the Judges had been received and before 
the Attorney-General was in a position to act. The Attorney- 
General's answer to this was that a private prosecutor was entitled 
to^half^the fines in such cases, and as Mr. Du Vernet by practi- 



THE STORV OF TBE "Mlltmi || " g] 

rally taking tliu case out of his (the Attornev-G*nerul'.\ h.-^. 
he must be left to talce hi, own c^ur« To S^X^i^ri^lj 

I'J^i T """J"« '° «*'™» «" unheard-of 0™^!*? 

fuller consideration, decided that he had no JuriXtion and S 
the trial was postponed until the'end of linX Tle?e M^ 
S^H h!!"'", ""' '""redounded to" the benefit ""The offendm 
LepartmJ^f'the"X''H '"'^''"5? ^'^th the Attorney Gener^", 
1^^ » J ■ J offenders would have been brought to iustice 

long ago and if found guilty, punished as thev deirvei B^ 
fnT/h'!"'^ •'l' A'K'n'^y -General in the first pllce an^ by bring'^